Neuroscientists: What’s the most interesting question right now?

by Neuroconscience

After 20 years of cognitive neuroscience, I sometimes feel frustrated by how little progress we’ve made. We still struggle with basic issues, like how to ask a subject if he’s in pain, or what exactly our multi-million dollar scanners measure. We lack a unifying theory linking information, psychological function, and neuroscientific measurement. We still publish all kinds of voodoo correlations, uncorrected p-values, and poorly operationalized blobfests. Yet, we’ve also laid some of the most important foundational research of our time. In twenty years we’ve mapped a mind boggling array of cognitive function. Some of these attempts at localization may not hold; others may be built on shaky functional definitions or downright poor methods. Even in the face of this uncertainty, the shear number and variety of functions that have been mapped is inspiring. Further, we’ve developed analytic tools to pave the way for an exciting new decade of multi-modal and connectomic research. Developments like resting-state fMRI, optogenetics, real time fMRI, and multi-modal imaging, make for a very exciting time to be a Cognitive Neuroscientist!

Online, things can seem a bit more pessimistic. Snarky methods blogs dedicated to revealing the worst in field tend to do well, and nearly any social-media savy neurogeek will lament the depressing state of science journalism and the brain. While I am also tired of incessantly phrenological, blob-obsessed reports (“research finds god spot in the brain, are your children safe??”) I think we share some of the blame for not communicating properly about what interests and challenges us. For me, some of the most exciting areas of research are those concerning getting straight about what our measurements mean- see the debates over noise in resting state or the neural underpinnings of the BOLD signal for example. Yet these issues are often reported as dry methodological reports, the writers themselves seemingly bored with the topic.

We need to do a better job illustrating to people just how complex and infantile our field is. The big, sexy issues are methodological in nature. They’re also phenomenological in nature. Right now neuroscience is struggling to define itself, unsure if we should be asking our subjects how they feel or anesthetizing them. I believe that if we can illustrate just how tenuous much of our research is, including the really nagging problems, the public will better appreciate seemingly nuanced issues like rest-stimulus interaction and noise-regression.

With that in mind- what are your most exciting questions, right now? What nagging thorn ails you at all steps in your research?

For me, the most interesting and nagging question is, what do people do when we ask them to do nothing? I’m talking about rest-stimulus interaction and mind wandering. There seem to be two prevailing (pro-resting state) views: that default mode network-related activity is related to subjective mind-wandering, and/or that it’s a form of global, integrative, stimulus independent neural variability. On the first view, variability in participants ability to remain on-task drive slow alterations in behavior and stimulus-evoked brain activity. On the other, innate and spontaneous rhythms synchronize large brain networks in ways that alter stimulus processing and enable memory formation. Either way, we’re left with the idea that a large portion of our supposedly well-controlled, stimulus-related brain activity is in fact predicted by uncontrolled intrinsic brain activity. Perhaps even defined by it! When you consider that all this is contingent on the intrinsic activity being real brain activity and not some kind of vascular or astrocyte-driven artifact, every research paradigm becomes a question of rest-stimulus interaction!

So neuroscientists, what keeps you up at night?