The return of neuroconscience

by Neuroconscience

Hello everyone! After an amazing visit back home to Tampa Florida for VSS and a little R&R in Denmark i’m back and feeling better than ever. Some of you may have noticed that i’ve been on an almost 6 month blogging hiatus. I’m just going to come right out and admit that after moving from Denmark to London, I really wasn’t sure what direction I wanted to take my blog. Changing institutions is always a bit of a bewildering experience, and a wise friend once advised me that it’s sometimes best to quietly observe new surroundings before diving right in. I think I needed some time to get used to being a part of the awesomeness that is the Queen Square neuroimaging hub. I also needed some time to reflect on the big picture of my research, this blog, and my overall social media presence.

But fear not! After the horrors of settling into London, I’m finally comfortable in my skin again with a new flat, a home office almost ready, and lots and lots of new ideas to share with you. I think part of my overall hesitancy was a kind of pondering just what I should be sharing. But I didn’t get this far by bottling up my research, so there isn’t much point in shuttering myself in now! I expect to be back to blogging in full form in the next week, as new projects here begin to get underway. But where is my research going?

The big picture will largely remain the same. I am interested as always in human consciousness, thought, self-awareness, and our capacity for growth along these dimensions. One thing I really love about my post-doc is that I’ve finally found a kind of thread weaving throughout my research all the way back to the days when I collected funny self-narratives in a broom closet at UCF. I think you could say I’m trying to connect the dots between how dynamic bodies shape and interact with our reflective minds, using the tools of perceptual decision making, predictive coding, and neuroimaging. Currently i’m developing a variety of novel experimental paradigms examining embodied self-awareness (i.e. our somatosensory, interoceptive, and affective sense of self), perceptual decision making and metacognition, and interrelations between these. You can expect to hear more about these topics soon.

Indeed, a principle reason I chose to join the FIL/ICN team was the unique emphasis and expertise here on predictive coding. My research has always been united by an interest in growth, plasticity, and change. During my PhD I came to see predictive coding/free energy schemes as a unifying framework under-which to unite our understanding of embodied and neural computation in terms of our ability to learn from new experiences.  As such I’m very happy to be in a place where not only can I be on the cutting edge of theoretical development, but also receive first-hand training in applying the latest computational modelling, connectivity, and multi-modal imaging techniques to my research questions. As always, given my obvious level of topical ADHD, you can be sure to expect coverage of a wide-range of cogneuro and cogsci topics.

So in general, you can expect posts covering these topics, my upcoming results, and general musings along these lines. As always i’m sure there will be plenty of methodsy nitpicking and philosophical navel gathering. In particular, my recent experience with a reviewer insisting that ‘embodiment’ = interoception has me itching to fire off a theoretical barrage – but I guess I should wait to publish that paper before taking to the streets. In the near future I have planned a series of short posts covering some of the cool posters and general themes I observed at the Vision Sciences Society conference this fall.

Finally, for my colleagues working on mindfulness and meditation research, a brief note. As you can probably gather, I don’t intend to return to this domain of study in the near future. My personal opinion of that topic is that it has become incredibly overhyped and incestous- the best research simply isn’t rising to the top. I know that many of the leaders in that community are well aware of that problem and are working to correct it, but for me I knew it was time to part ways and return to more general research. I do believe that mindfulness has an important role to play in both self-awareness and well-being, and hope that the models I am currently developing might one day further refine our understanding of these practices. However, I guess it’s worth noting that for me, meditation was always more of a kind of Varellian way to manipulate plasticity and consciousness rather than an end in itself; as I no longer buy into the enactive/neurophenomenological paradigm, I guess it’s self explanatory that I would be moving on to other things (like actual consciousness studies! :P). I do hope to see that field continue to grow and mature, and look forward to fruitful collaborations along those lines.

 

That’s it folks! Prepare yourself for a new era of neuroconscience :) Cheers to an all new year, all new research, and new directions! Viva la awareness!