Neuroconscience

The latest thoughts, musings, and data in cognitive science and neuroscience.

Tag: science

Could a papester button irreversibly break down the research paywall?

A friend just sent me the link to the Aaron Swartz Memorial JSTOR liberator. We started talking about it and it led to a pretty interesting idea.

As soon as I saw this it clicked: we need papester. We need a simple browser plugin that can recognize, download and re-upload any research document automatically (think zotero) to BitTorrent (this was Aaron’s original idea, just crowdsourced). These would then be automatically turned into torrents with an associated magnet link. The plugin would interact with a lightweight torrent client, using a set limit of your bandwidth (say 5%) to constantly seed back any files you have in your (zotero) library folder. Also, it would automatically use part of the bandwidth to seed missing papers (first working through a queue of DOIs of papers that were searched for by others and then just for any missing paper in reverse chronological order), so that over time all papers would be on BitTorrent. The links would be archived by google; any search engine could then find them and the plug-in would show the PDF download link.

Once this system is in place, a pirate-bay/reddit mash-up could help sort the magnet links as a meta-data rich papester torrent tracker. Users could posts comments and reviews, which would themselves be subject to karma. Over time a sorting algorithm could give greater weight to reviews from authors who consistently review unretracted papers, creating a kind of front page where “hot” would give you the latest research and “lasting” would give you timeless classics. Separating the sorting mechanism – which can essentially be any tracker – and the rating/meta-data system ensures that neither can be easily brought down. If users wish they could compile independent trackers for particular topics or highly rated papers, form review committees, and request new experiments to address flagged issues in existing articles. In this way we would ensure not only an everlasting and loss-protected research database, but irreversibly push academic publishing into an open-access and democratic review system. Students and people without access to scientific knowledge could easily find forgotten classics and the latest buzz with a simple sort. We need an “research-reddit” rating layer  – why not solve Open Access and peer review in one go?

Is this feasible? There are about 50 million papers in existence[1]. If we estimate about 500 kilobytes on average per paper, that’s 25 million MB of data, or  25 terabytes. While that may sound like a lot, remember that most torrent trackers already list much more data than this and that available bandwidth increases annually. If we can archive a ROM of every videogame created, why not papers? The entire collection of magnet links could take up as little as 1GB of data, making it easy to periodically back up the archive, ensure the system is resilient to take-downs, and re-seed less known or sought after papers. Just imagine it- all of our knowledge stored safely in an completely open collection, backed by the power of the swarm, organized by reviews, comments, and ratings, accessible to all. It would revolutionize the way we learn and share knowledge.

Of course there would be ruthless resistance to this sort of thing from publishers. It would be important to take steps to protect yourself, perhaps through TOR. The small size of the files would facilitate better encryption. When universities inevitably move to block uploads, tags could be used to later upload acquired files quickly on a public-wifi hotspot. There are other benefits as well- currently there are untold numbers of classic papers available online in reference only. What incentive is there for libraries to continue scanning these? A papester-backed uploader karma system could help bring thousands of these documents irreversibly into the fold. Even in the case that publishers found some way to stifle the system, as with Napster  the damage would be done. Just as we were pushed irrevocably towards new forms of music consumption – direct download, streaming, donate-to-listen – big publishers would be forced toward an open access model to recover costs. Finally such a system might move us closer to a self-publishing ARXIV model. In the case that you couldn’t afford open access, you could self-publish your own PDF to the system. User reviews and ratings could serve as a first layer of feedback for you to improve the article. The idea or data – with your name behind it – would be out there fast and free.

edit:

Another cool feature would be a DOI search. When a user searches for a paper that isn’t available, papster would automatically add that paper to a request queue.

edit2/disclaimer:

This is a thought experiment about an illegal solution and it’s possible consequences and benefits. Do with it what you will but recognize the gap between the theoretical and the actual!

1.
Arif Jinha (2010). Article 50 million: an estimate of the number of scholarly articles in existence Learned Publishing, 23 (3), 258-263 DOI: 10.1087/20100308 free pre-print available from author here

Neuroscientists: What’s the most interesting question right now?

After 20 years of cognitive neuroscience, I sometimes feel frustrated by how little progress we’ve made. We still struggle with basic issues, like how to ask a subject if he’s in pain, or what exactly our multi-million dollar scanners measure. We lack a unifying theory linking information, psychological function, and neuroscientific measurement. We still publish all kinds of voodoo correlations, uncorrected p-values, and poorly operationalized blobfests. Yet, we’ve also laid some of the most important foundational research of our time. In twenty years we’ve mapped a mind boggling array of cognitive function. Some of these attempts at localization may not hold; others may be built on shaky functional definitions or downright poor methods. Even in the face of this uncertainty, the shear number and variety of functions that have been mapped is inspiring. Further, we’ve developed analytic tools to pave the way for an exciting new decade of multi-modal and connectomic research. Developments like resting-state fMRI, optogenetics, real time fMRI, and multi-modal imaging, make for a very exciting time to be a Cognitive Neuroscientist!

Online, things can seem a bit more pessimistic. Snarky methods blogs dedicated to revealing the worst in field tend to do well, and nearly any social-media savy neurogeek will lament the depressing state of science journalism and the brain. While I am also tired of incessantly phrenological, blob-obsessed reports (“research finds god spot in the brain, are your children safe??”) I think we share some of the blame for not communicating properly about what interests and challenges us. For me, some of the most exciting areas of research are those concerning getting straight about what our measurements mean- see the debates over noise in resting state or the neural underpinnings of the BOLD signal for example. Yet these issues are often reported as dry methodological reports, the writers themselves seemingly bored with the topic.

We need to do a better job illustrating to people just how complex and infantile our field is. The big, sexy issues are methodological in nature. They’re also phenomenological in nature. Right now neuroscience is struggling to define itself, unsure if we should be asking our subjects how they feel or anesthetizing them. I believe that if we can illustrate just how tenuous much of our research is, including the really nagging problems, the public will better appreciate seemingly nuanced issues like rest-stimulus interaction and noise-regression.

With that in mind- what are your most exciting questions, right now? What nagging thorn ails you at all steps in your research?

For me, the most interesting and nagging question is, what do people do when we ask them to do nothing? I’m talking about rest-stimulus interaction and mind wandering. There seem to be two prevailing (pro-resting state) views: that default mode network-related activity is related to subjective mind-wandering, and/or that it’s a form of global, integrative, stimulus independent neural variability. On the first view, variability in participants ability to remain on-task drive slow alterations in behavior and stimulus-evoked brain activity. On the other, innate and spontaneous rhythms synchronize large brain networks in ways that alter stimulus processing and enable memory formation. Either way, we’re left with the idea that a large portion of our supposedly well-controlled, stimulus-related brain activity is in fact predicted by uncontrolled intrinsic brain activity. Perhaps even defined by it! When you consider that all this is contingent on the intrinsic activity being real brain activity and not some kind of vascular or astrocyte-driven artifact, every research paradigm becomes a question of rest-stimulus interaction!

So neuroscientists, what keeps you up at night?

Uta Frith – The Curious Brain in the Museum

It’s not everyday that collaborations between the humanities and sciences lead to tangible fruits- but I’m excited to share with you one case in which they did, with surprisingly cute results! Leading development psychologist and Interacting Minds Research Foundation Professor, Uta Frith recently gave the Victoria and Albert Museum’s 2010 Henry Cole lecture. Below you will find the power-point slides from this talk, in which she discussed the relationship between her recent work on social learning and the experience of a museum. Interestingly, a film maker was inspired to put together the following short film, “The Curious Brain in the Museum.” It’s a very well done film and a fascinating look at the museum through Uta’s eyes.

Here are the slides from the talk:

And the resulting video:

In this short film, specially commissioned as part of the Royal Society’s 350th anniversary celebrations in 2010, Professor Uta Frith FRS and her young companion, Amalie Heath-Born, find out just what goes on inside our brains when we view the treasures on display at London’s world-famous Victoria and Albert Museum.

“The human mind/brain is exquisitely social and automatically responds to signals sent by other people. These signals can be artfully designed objects, and these can come from people long in the past. The art and design that is embodied in the object can evoke in the brain different streams of imagination: how it was made, the value it represents, and the meaning it conveys. The human mind/brain has ancient reward systems, which respond to, say, stimuli signaling food to the hungry, but also respond to social stimuli signaling relevance to the curious. This makes for a never ending well spring of spontaneous teaching and learning. Education in the museum environment is perfectly attuned to the curious mind.”  Uta Frith (2010)

You can read more about the event and the film on the Royal Society page.

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